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The Best Resource For Your Log Home Care and Maintenance  
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       Log Home Resource Center P.O. Box 242776, Arkansas 72223 Phone 1 (800) 441-1564
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Sashco
 Caulking and Chinking Stain
   




1. Are Sashco products environmentally safe?

2. Why can't I just use a clear coating on my logs?

3. Is it necessary to stain my logs?

4. How long will my stain last?

5. What temperature is appropriate for staining?

6. Should I chink or stain first? Why?

7. When should I begin to stain?

8. What is the best way to remove an existing stain?

9. What is wrong with corn blasting?

10. What is wrong with sandblasting?

11. What is wrong with power washing?

12. What is the main difference between Capture and High Sierra?

13. How many coats of Capture/Cascade should I use? Why?

14. Can I apply Cascade by itself?

15. Do I have to use Cascade? Will Cascade rejuvenate my existing stain?

16. Can I use High Sierra and Capture on the interior?

17. How do I tell when I need to reapply a coat of Cascade?

18. Can I put Capture/Cascade over High Sierra and vice-versa?

19. How is Symphony different than other interior products?

20. Is Symphony tintable?

21. How many coats of Symphony do I need to apply?

 

 


 
 

While Sashco’s Stacker caulk can be used for this application, Log Builder will perform even better.


1. Are Sashco products environmentally safe?
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Yes, all of the Sashco log home products are made in compliance with the relevant environmental regulations. Sashco makes every effort to use the least toxic chemicals possible for its products while still delivering the kind of performance required for the log home industry. Finally, most of Sashco’s products are water-based which makes them even more “environmentally friendly.”

2. Why can't I just use a clear coating on my logs?
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Although this is the preferred look for most homeowners, clear coatings do not provide long-lasting protection from ultra violet light. Most stain manufacturers add UV absorbers or inhibitors to their coatings but over a relatively short period of time these additives slowly breakdown or migrate becoming less effective at stopping the damaging effects of sunlight. The result is that either the coating itself or the underlying wood eventually begin to change color--usually darkening. When this color shift starts, this is a sign that the wood beneath the coating is beginning to deteriorate, it is also actually decomposing. Eventually the coating can begin to pull away from the wood and major lifting and peeling can occur leaving your logs totally unprotected.

3. Is it necessary to stain my logs?
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Yes, the following are reasons why it is highly recommended to stain your log home.

1) Without a good coating on the exterior of logs, the wood will darken and degrade very quickly when left unprotected against the sun and weathering.

2) Uncoated wood absorbs much more water than coated wood does. When wood absorbs water it swells significantly and then shrinks again when dry weather returns. This repeatedly severe dimensional cycling of the wood leads to the development of many more checks than would otherwise occur and enlarges the size of those that would have occurred even with a coating in place.

3) Without a coating on the exterior surface, sealants applied to the joints between logs or to large checks usually will have a very difficult time maintaining adhesion to the wood. The reason is that wood, especially when wet, becomes very, very difficult to adhere to by any type of sealant, and uncoated wood becomes far more saturated with water in the immediate vicinity of the bond-line of the sealant than does coated wood.

4) Coatings, by repelling a large volume of moisture, help prevent mold, mildew and rot from occurring. These fungal organisms require moisture in order to survive and thrive. Consequently, the more moisture you can keep your logs from absorbing – with a good quality coating on the surface – the more you minimize the potential for fungi to do damage.

4. How long will my stain last?
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Typically on the southern exposure of a home, a stain may last 2-3 years. On the other sides of the home a stain can be expected to last 3-4 years. These numbers are just estimates and can be greatly influenced by the following factors.

1) How clean and sound the wood is when the coating is applied.
2) The moisture content of the wood.
3) The weather both at the time of application and during the few days immediately following application.
4) The method of stain application.
5) The temperature of the wood surface at the time of application.
6) How much weather exposure the coating experiences.
7) How much abrasion or other mechanical stress is inflicted on the coating.
8) The compatibility of any previously applied coatings (either in or on the wood) to the new coating.
9) The nature of the coating formulation itself.
10) The amount of moisture that can grossly saturate the wood after the coating is applied (as in dealing with large numbers of checks in logs), etc.


5. What temperature is appropriate for staining?
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The minimum temperature should be 45 degrees and rising. The maximum temperature should be below 90 degrees. It is important to note that this is in reference to the temperature of the logs.

6. Should I chink or stain first? Why?
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It is always best to stain first for the following reasons.

1) Stain, being a thin liquid, generally has a greater ability to penetrate into wood (especially when it is properly back-brushed during application) and establish better adhesion to the micro-porous wood than does a thick pasty material like caulking or chinking (which generally cannot penetrate as well, even when tooled). Consequently, a compatible stain can act as a primer for caulking or chinking, further enhancing a sealant’s adhesion to the logs.

2) It is much easier to clean the surface of the log with stain on it as runs occur of tooling water when these runs flow down on the upper curvature of the lower log. Bare wood absorbs the polymer-laden tooling water, and it dries out much faster (leaving potential stain marks) than it would on wood that is previously coated with a stain.

7. When should I begin to stain?
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Proper log preparation is a large factor in the success of the stain material. Logs that have been exposed to the elements need to be cleaned through sanding or some form of blasting. Even new logs need to have the “mill glaze” removed before the application of stain. This can be done through the previously described methods. This step should be done no sooner than a week prior to staining. In conclusion, virtually all logs need to have some form of preparation done in order to achieve the right staining surface.

8. What is the best way to remove an existing stain?
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Although there are several methods of stain removal, i.e., sand blasting, chemical stripping, just to name a couple, we recommend corn media blasting as the best overall method. It is effective, non-toxic, quick, less destructive to the wood than sand, and you won’t have to worry about interior water damage from blasting your home with water under pressure. We rent a corncob media-blasting machine called the Kernel.

9. What is wrong with corn blasting?
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As with any blasting process, the media will find its way into your home, so be aware that you will have to do some interior clean up of the dust and the media itself. Although corn blasting doesn’t generally leave as textured a surface as sand blasting, some people prefer a smooth log surface, so you may have to do some light follow-up sanding by hand.

10. What is wrong with sandblasting?
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Sand blasting can be too aggressive on wood creating an undesirable surface texture. It typically takes someone very experienced to avoid this problem. Sand blasting can severely etch glass, so you must mask all windows before attempting to blast your home. This is not the case with corn cob blasting. Sandblasting generates air-borne dusts of silica, which can cause silicosis – so it is important to make sure anyone near the blasting operation wears proper respiratory protection. Once you have finished blasting, then there is the significant clean up of the spent sand.

11. What is wrong with power washing?
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Power washing not only raises the grain, but can create long “fingers” of wood fibers (called “felting”) that will generally have to be sanded off once the wood has dried out. Water under pressure being blasted against outside walls can find its way into your home. If you must power wash, take necessary precautions to protect the interior of your home: remove wall hangings, pull furniture away from the exterior walls, have towels handy for drying wall and floor surfaces. After you’ve power washed, you must wait for the logs to dry before applying any stain. You may miss out on a window of good weather opportunity while you are waiting for the logs to dry out. [Note: Virtually all of these problems are non- existent with corn cob media blasting.]

12. What is the main difference between Capture and High Sierra?
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The “open time” of High Sierra is longer than that of Capture, helping to prevent lap marks when brushing. Capture is more flexible than High Sierra, it does not penetrate into the wood as much, which is by design. Capture is top-coated with clear Cascade, which can be used as a maintenance coat a few times over the years to make such early maintenance relatively easier than re-applying pigmented High Sierra. In conclusion, the two stains are created through the use of significantly different polymers, which gives each product its’ own appearance.

13. How many coats of Capture/Cascade should I use? Why?
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One heavy coat of Capture is recommended; followed by one coat of Cascade. If the product is applied heavily it can build sufficient film thickness to protect the wood and provide several years of good performance. If one coat is applied that is too thin, less durability will be the result, and more frequent recoating will be required.

14. Can I apply Cascade by itself?
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Cascade should not be applied by itself, unless re-coating over Capture stain. Cascade has additives to prevent attack from ultraviolet light, but these additives are not nearly as efficient in protecting the wood surface as the pigments we add to Capture stain.

15. Do I have to use Cascade? Will Cascade rejuvenate my existing stain?
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No, Cascade does not absolutely have to be used over Capture – but it is a very good idea. Capture remains relatively tacky because the polymers in the stain are very rubbery in an effort to handle the movement of the logs. Cascade dries to a harder finish and reduces the pick up of dirt and dust on the logs. Also, when Cascade is applied over Capture, it brings out the “depth” of the stain, enhancing the grain of the wood and providing a soft luster that is very attractive. Finally, if a reapplication of clear Cascade is done 2-3 years after the initial application, then the overall stain system can be bolstered, both aesthetically and in endurance. Eventually, just reapplying more Cascade will no longer be sufficient, and at that point more colored Capture stain will be required.

16. Can I use High Sierra and Capture on the interior?
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Yes, both products may be used on the interior. Sashco suggests top-coating both High Sierra and Capture with Symphony to enhance the appearance and give the protection you need on the interior of your home.

17. How do I tell when I need to reapply a coat of Cascade?
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Generally, loss of gloss or variations in gloss may be an indication that another coat of Cascade should be applied to your home. An annual check of the moisture prone areas (i.e. low courses of logs) and upper curvature of your logs will often give you an indication that you need to re-coat. Wet the area in question, and if there is a color shift or an area where the water is drawn into the coating, it might be an indication another coat of Cascade is needed. Cascade can easily be applied with a garden sprayer, so an annual re-coat is not bad practice.

18. Can I put Capture/Cascade over High Sierra and vice versa?
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Yes, the surfaces need to be clean and sound, with all other appropriate application procedures followed.

19. How is Symphony different than other interior products?
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Symphony is formulated to be compatible with both Log Jam, Log Builder and Conceal. Other interior clear products may have additives that will cause problems with adhesion of Sashco’s log sealants. Symphony is also formulated to be more flexible than many interior clears to better handle the movement that typically occurs in logs.

20 . Is Symphony tintable?
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Yes, Symphony is tintable with universal colorants found in most paint stores. Always test the color in a small, inconspicuous area of your home.

21 . How many coats of Symphony do I need to apply?
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It depends on the look you want for your logs. Normally, 2-3 coats of Symphony will give your logs both the look and protection you want.

 

Log Home Resource Center
P.O. Box 242776
Little Rock, Arkansas 72223

1 (800) 441-1564


 
 
 

Same Day Shipping

The Log Home Resource Center offers same day shipping to your home, workplace or jobsite from Tennessee, Arkansas, and Colorado. Ask about our free freight program.

Insect Control

See our ACCESSORIES SECTION for the carpenter bee kit. Please call us if you have any questions.

Bandsaws

We have high quality bandsaws by Hudson. See Our BANDSAW PAGE for details.


Furniture
We have a variety of custom furniture products ranging from bedframes to vanites. Check out our FURNITURE PAGE for pictures and details.